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Canada Post celebrates International Women’s Day with special stamp
© 2015 Canada Post Corporation

Canada Post celebrates International Women’s Day with special stamp

Canada Post issued a special stamp on International Women’s Day, celebrating the centenary of women’s suffrage in Canada.

The special stamp issue marks 100 years since the first Canadian women won the right to vote.

This stamp, designed by Winnipeg’s Tetro, features a clever fashioning of the Venus symbol, commonly used to represent women, from the letters “o” and “t” in the word “vote.”

The colours of black (under printed with cyan blue for greater drama) and gold were adopted by advocates of women’s suffrage in Canada and the United States.

To the right, vertical text in English and French highlights the theme of women’s suffrage and indicates the dates of this important centennial.

International Women’s Day

First celebrated in 1911, International Women’s Day is marked every March 8. The theme of this year’s event is ‘Pledge for Parity.’

Year 2011 marked 100 years since the celebration of International Women’s Day.

International Women’s Day (March 8) is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity.

International Women’s Day is a collective day of global celebration and a call for gender parity. No one government, NGO, charity, corporation, academic institution, women’s network or media hub is solely responsible for International Women’s Day.

Canada Post celebrates International Women’s Day with special stamp
© 2015 Canada Post Corporation

Canadian women right to vote

While Canadian women began seeking the right to vote as early as the 1870s, it wasn’t until the First World War that their lack of equal political rights began to gain mainstream attention.

After fighting for political franchise for nearly four decades, Canadian feminists saw their cause advance significantly during the First World War, a time when many women served as nurses, worked in factories and offices, or raised families alone.

Female voters in three Canadian provinces, Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, first earned the right to cast provincial ballots in 1916, while the federal suffrage was finally granted in May, 1918, taking effect on January 1, 1919.

Still, many women continued to be excluded, notably those whose background was from the former Austro-Hungarian Empire, several Asian countries, women of pacifist sectarian communities, and women from Inuit and First Nations communities.

It was not until 1960 that all Canadian women, regardless of ethnicity or Indigenous status, were eligible to fully participate in the political process.

Title: Canada Post celebrates International Women’s Day
Date of Issue: 8 March 2016
Country: Canada
Denominations: Permanent

Source: Canada Post

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